Discussion of document: Prolonged dopamine signalling in striatum signals proximity and value of distant rewards

In the Intro: "However, in many real-life situations, animals must move over large distances to reach their goals. These behaviours require ongoing motivational levels to be adjusted flexibly according to changing environmental conditions. The importance of such control of ongoing motivation is reflected in the severe impairments suffered in dopamine deficiency disorders, including Parkinson’s disease."

imalsogreg(36) 3 years ago

I'm confused about how dopamine's role in movement (where I thought of it as more of a low-level 'hardware' thing - squelching the activity of motor commands) relates to dopamine's role in motivation. I though the consensus was that these two roles are kind of spatially segregated into different parts of striatum (or that striatum does strictly motor stuff, and nucleus accumbens does strictly cognitive/motivational stuff). But here the two ideas are mooshed together, and in fact it seems like you're talking about Parkinson's motor control as a motivation issue. Is there some new nuance in the definition of 'motor control' and 'motivation' where the two aren't really orthogonal? I felt like Parkinson's movement disorders are totally unrelated to motivation (b/c clearly these people *want* to move). What am I missing? Thanks!

imalsogreg(36) 3 years ago

How do voltametry measurement voltages relate to the voltages applied with stimulating electrotes? What are the chances that the measurements electrically activated terminals or cell bodies in the experiments? How much of the dopamine gets oxidized by the probe, and is unavailable for signalling (I imagine it doesn't change diffuse [DA] much, but would be nice to have an estimate)

imalsogreg(36) 3 years ago

I have been putting araifmftions on Notepad on my Cell Phone, including some of Howard's thanks. I need some suggestions I made the choice to go drug free when I was diagnosed in June 2012. I have even moved to a larger town (Spokane, WA) to have better choice of PT, etc., not so far to drive to PT, etc. When I first got here I thought I should participate in all PD sponsored activities. Went to a conference where all they did was talk about the new drugs for PD don't need that my family including my husband aren't happy with my choices, my husband didn't even move here with me-I have a small apt. kids live here (we have a farm 70 miles away) he LOVES the farm even though he quit actively farming 12 yrs ago we have a share cropper who farms the land (hay & grain) he won't even help w/FSR I have yet to get someone kids won't help - Have a male friend who volunteered (a classmate from hi school I chair class reunions [small class]) need suggestions regarding how to deal w/family's bad atttitude abt my decisions.

Anonymous 3 years ago

Many factors can alter <a href="http://qqgmjpog.com">sonomee</a>'s eating pattern from disorders within the body to emotional ones. Mine stems from an underactive thyroid! I was really heavy during my early childhood till age 12. I had a 42inch waist line and weighed in a good 100kgs! This also came about with all the heavy family cooking and tons of desserts after. To this day I have a very bad sweet tooth. After 12, I battled with an eating disorder just so that I could be slim, however that gave rise to other major complications. Let me remind you I am a male. Fast forward to today, I am now a fitness junkie and into good nutritious eating habits. I do give in to my sweet cravings but only one day a week or in small bite size portions during the week. Like you I have trained to eating healthy. I am now a good size 32-34 waist depending on my diet. As scientists suggest that less dopamine can lead to overeating, I just think that bad nutrition habits, especially coming from a cultured background, could lead to obesity! Again various factors could give rise to obesity so I do not agree entirely with the research.

Anonymous 3 years ago

Hi TrudyI know from my own experience that it can be tough to deal with fimlay and friends when they do not support or agree with your decisions. The most disarming way I deal with people like that (especially when I care about them) is with empathy (checking out with them what I imagine their feelings and needs might be as they consider my choices). So I say something like, I imagine you're worried and would like to know I'm okay and have the support I need . Then, whatever response they give me, I stay with empathy (guessing their feelings and needs until they indicate they have been heard) only then will I ask if they're open to hearing my point of view (they're more likely to consider it if they have a sense that they are respected and heard even if you don't agree with them). Marshall Rosenberg's book, Nonviolent Communication, a Language of Life may be a great help as you navigate this territory (all the time trusting and valuing yourself and your choices in life) http://dewnugnc.com [url=http://ztaejyvta.com]ztaejyvta[/url] [link=http://kkqyywx.com]kkqyywx[/link]

Anonymous 3 years ago