Discussion of document: Prolonged dopamine signalling in striatum signals proximity and value of distant rewards

In the Intro: "However, in many real-life situations, animals must move over large distances to reach their goals. These behaviours require ongoing motivational levels to be adjusted flexibly according to changing environmental conditions. The importance of such control of ongoing motivation is reflected in the severe impairments suffered in dopamine deficiency disorders, including Parkinson’s disease."


imalsogreg(20) 3 years ago

I'm confused about how dopamine's role in movement (where I thought of it as more of a low-level 'hardware' thing - squelching the activity of motor commands) relates to dopamine's role in motivation. I though the consensus was that these two roles are kind of spatially segregated into different parts of striatum (or that striatum does strictly motor stuff, and nucleus accumbens does strictly cognitive/motivational stuff). But here the two ideas are mooshed together, and in fact it seems like you're talking about Parkinson's motor control as a motivation issue. Is there some new nuance in the definition of 'motor control' and 'motivation' where the two aren't really orthogonal? I felt like Parkinson's movement disorders are totally unrelated to motivation (b/c clearly these people want to move). What am I missing? Thanks!


imalsogreg(20) 3 years ago

How do voltametry measurement voltages relate to the voltages applied with stimulating electrotes? What are the chances that the measurements electrically activated terminals or cell bodies in the experiments? How much of the dopamine gets oxidized by the probe, and is unavailable for signalling (I imagine it doesn't change diffuse [DA] much, but would be nice to have an estimate)


imalsogreg(20) 3 years ago